Commonplace Book (July 30th, 2017)

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“He was the first man I ever met who, when we were about ten feet away from each another, I could feel a force pulling us together, like there was an electrical circuit that must be completed. When we left each other I could sense its resistance. ‘Can you feel that?’ I’d sometimes ask him, and he’d say, ‘Of course.’ Then when it broke there was both loneliness and this elated, dizzy certainty of liberation…It’s very hard to know, in the early few months of a love affairs, what is real and what is imaginary. You find signs and confirmations everywhere. Men passing you on the street stop you to tell you that you’re beautiful. Random street signs or airplanes passing overhead prophesies your happiness. Yet the mind of your lover remains as closed to you as that of a face on a billboard, or a distracted cab driver fiddling with this radio.” Clancy Martin, Bad Sex

“Hostess and guest drift into the kitchen…In the kitchen bookshelves are the works of H.G. Wells. She reads them sometimes while the kettle boils, and is no longer sure if they are any good. She regrets the fact that no one will let her forget her afford with Wells: ‘Just how important is something that ends when you are thirty?’ She would rather talk, affectionately, about her late husband, Henry Andrews.” Victoria Glendinning, Rebecca West: A Life

“The more wines I tried, the less of a gamble it became. Instead, each new bottle became an opportunity to learn about wine, the world, and myself. I realized that wine was not a gamble at all, but an experience. It’s abstract yet personal, allowing you to indulge in the moment of how it physically tastes while evoking memories from taste and sensation past. In wine, there are no rules. A bottle of wine cane remind you of your adolescent summers at the beach and a field in France you’ve never seen, in the same sip.” Marisa A. Ross, Wine All The Time: The Casual Guide to Confident Drinking 

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